Light of the Stereo

Light of the Stereo

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

From the Shelf: Summer Cannibals - No Makeup (2013)



No Makeup

The dredge-fuzz rock of the Summer Cannibals debut album No Makeup has a bold thickness to it.  With heavy dream rhythms and precisely punctuated drum beats, the opening track “Sounds” foreshadows the lovely album to follow.
Ripe with the thickened guitar tones more equated with 70’s rock and 90’s grunge the Summer Cannibals have mastered a truly luscious sound on their first album.  The weighty atmosphere of these songs is the perfect home for Jessica Boudreax’s sultry vocals, while the caressing waves of instrumentation is nearly hypnotic in nature.  An instant classic, from yet another Portland band that makes supporting local music way too easy,The Summer Cannibals’ No Makeup foretells of budding greatness. With tracks like the rocking swagger of “Wives” and building drive of “Wear Me Out”this boldly wonderful album is a must have.  Even if you haven’t heard the band yet, pick it up. It will be love at first note.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Tuesday Double Feature: JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound "Rouse Yourself" & Luke Winslow-King " Moving On (Towards Better Days)"

This week's Tuesday Double Feature includes videos for two uniquely interesting artists that just happen to share room on the Bloodshot Record label and will be playing shows her in Portland this coming week. So enjoy the videos and if you like what you see, go check them out live.

JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound - "Rouse Yourself"


The lovely soul music of JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound is the kind of dance inspiring ear candy that makes you glad to be alive.  Having just released their latest album Howl, the boys will be playing this Thursday evening at Lola's Room downtown. Here's the 411:

Thursday, August 15th
Lola's Room
1332 W Burnside
Doors: 7PM / Show:8PM
Adv.: $15 / Day Of: $17
All Ages



Luke Winslow-King - "Moving On (Towards Better Days)"


The music of Luke Winslow-King is a throw back to a simpler time when jazz and blues were more closely related. Touring on the heels of his latest album The Coming Tide, Winslow-King will be stopping to play two free show in our area. Here are the details:

Friday, August 16th
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St
Show: 7PM
Free
21 & Over

 and

Sunday, August 18th
Elizabeth Caruthers Park
3508 SW Moody Ave
Show: 3PM
Free
All ages

Monday, August 12, 2013

Cure for the Mondays: The Heavy - "Can't Play Dead"

The Heavy - "Can't Play Dead"

Blues and voodoo seem to go hand in hand, it must be all the mojo.



The rocking soul music of UK's The Heavy has all the manic feet attitude of James Brown's ghost. Known for the commercial use of their song "How You Like Me Now?" this band is so much more. With a funk and groove that's undeniable, you'll find that you can't stop dancing. Don't believe me, then check them out for yourself this Tuesday, August 13th at our own Mississippi Studios. Here's all the info:
Mississippi Studio
Doors: 8PM / Show: 9PM
Adv.: $12 / Day Of: $12
21 & Over

Sunday, August 11, 2013

Living Room Performance: Grace Potter and the Nocturnals - Medicine

Grace Potter and the Nocturnals - "Medicine"

Mophonics Studio, NewYork New York

2010



Recently at BLS we've been talking a lot about soul music. So I thought we'd get the women's perspective in the bluesy seductiveness of Grace Potter and the Nocturnals.Still riding high from the release of last years The Lion The Beast The Beat,Grace and the band have spent their summer on tour and will continue into Fall. Having just come through town last month, we might not get to see her live again until next year, but the great thing is no matter her touring time table we always have her music.

Saturday, August 10, 2013

Sound Art: The Heavy North American Tour

By Tony Whitebeard of New Analog Design
Designed By Tony Whitebread of New Analog Design the North American Tour Poster for The Heavy is truly bitchin'.
Sporting the image of a dapper Wolf-man caught in mid transformation, this poster lends itself well to the ferocious power that the band is know for.
Catch the band this Tuesday, August 13th at Mississippi Studios.
Here are the details:
The Heavy
The Silent Comedy
Mississippi Studio
3939 N Mississippi
Doors: 8PM / Show: 9PM
Adv.: $12 / Day Of: $12
21 & Over

10 Questions: Andy Rosenstein Of JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound


The powerful Neo-Soul group JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound have been making some of the most groove luscious music to come out of Chicago in years. Extremely busy with the release of their latest album, Howl,earlier this year and a tour in support. The band will be swing into town to play Lola's Room this Thursday, August 15th.(See latest Triple Crown)
Andy Rosenstein, who lends keys, percussion and vocals to the band was generous in taking some time out of their busy schedule to talk to us about the band and their latest release.  

BLS: It’s been about a year since By the Light of the Stereo checked in with you. How has 2013 treated you? Are there any new developments with you and the band?

AR: 2013 has been pretty wild so far. In the winter and spring we finished the new record Howl and got all of the new music ready to perform. Since May we've been on the road. We played South By Southwest again and hit up the Firefly Festival out east, which was amazing. We went to France and are heading back for a tour all around western Europe in October. It's been great.

BLS: Back in May you released your latest album Howl. With this being your third album how was the recording and promotion experience different this time around?

AR: I wasn't in the group when they recorded the last record (Want More) but I joined months before it officially came out and did the entire Want More tour as a member of the band. I can say without hesitation that we did a lot more driving last time around. This time, thankfully we've done some flying to gigs, mostly for the west coast. It has made it a lot easier to travel so much. The other big difference this time around is that we've been getting a little more radio play, which really helps.

BLS: Compared to the rollercoaster energy of your last album, Howl plays with a more sedated and even keel. What do you attribute this too?

AR: I think on this album we were looking to make music where we didn't restrict which of our influences we would include. That allowed us to think about post-60s/70s sounds that we like, but that the band had pushed aside in the past-- synths, brit-pop, disco, modern electronic sounds, etc. Somehow when we added all of that together, it might have come out a little less rock'n'roll.
Another factor might have been me joining as the band's first keyboard player who wasn't just a side-man but who worked on the songs and arrangements. Unlike Billy and Ben I don't come from Post-Punk music, so I might have softened things a little.

BLS: Emotionally this album has more prevalent themes of loss, pain and regret. What dose this reveal of your head space when writing these songs?

AR: We wrote Howl during the year and a half of touring on Want More, so we definitely had plenty of time away from people we loved, and complications associated with that. I think that's part of it.
We also recorded Howl in Montreal because we wanted to work with Howard Bilerman, a producer with both Arcade Fire and Wolf Parade albums to his name. Going away to record was also meant to keep us focused on the work, and a little isolated from everyday pressures. It definitely succeeded in making us isolated. Montreal is great, but December there is grey and cold, and I think that comes through, even though it's not a wintery or downtempo album.

BLS: In the process of creating these last three albums have you picked up any new influences along the way?

AR: Everyone in the band is always listening to music that's new to them, whether it's something that just came out or an old gem they just discovered. We also share things that we each take for granted but that other members of the band don't know. And we definitely keep up on what is happening in the music world.
For example, we wrote and recorded Before You Die months before Get Lucky was released, but both songs have Nile Rodgers and Chic as major influences. It must have just been the right time.

BLS: You’re currently on the last leg of a fairly extensive US tour with a European tour looming in the near future. How has the road been treating you this time around? Are their any new experiences waiting for you across the pond.

AR: There are always new experiences out there. This will be our biggest tour of Europe yet, and I know everyone is really excited. The road can be incredibly fun, but it can also be pretty challenging. The trick is to roll with the punches as best you can and try to have perspective and appreciation for all the strange things that happen.

BLS: You recently released a video for “Rouse Yourself” staring Aubrey Plaza (of NBC’s Park & Recreation) and Jake Johnson (of FOX’s New Girl). What was it like to have such recognizable individuals working on this project?

AR: It was very cool for both Jake and Aubrey to make time for us. Jake's an old buddy of Billy's and has come out to see us a handful of times. He also put up a JCBUS poster in his 'bedroom' set on The New Girl, which I know a lot of people saw. With a music video-- and with making an album more generally-- the goal is to get the most people possible to hear your music, and having some big names helps on that count.

BLS: Do you find the road as a source of inspiration or do you feel the studio is more conducive to your creative process? With your busy schedule have you had a chance to write any new material?

AR: For me, it's the studio all the way. I can't write on the road because there's no privacy and quiet. When I'm at home alone is when I can clear my mind. I think to varying degrees that's generally the way the other guys work, too, but I don't want to speak for everyone.
On the other hand, I saw a shouting hobo in a park in Toronto a few weeks ago and I intend to lift a few of the things he said wholesale for a song at some point. He had some really top-shelf craziness.

BLS: If you could open for any of the forbearers of Soul, alive or dead, who would it be, and why?

AR: Hard question. I think Sly Stone, but not because our music and his have a ton in common, but just because he's my favorite.

BLS: Name 5 bands you love but who few people have heard of?

AR:
Bailiff : Great chicago indie rock trio with a lot of blues influence, but done in what I think is a unique way. They're about to put out a brand new record, which they let us hear, and it's amazing.

Wild Belle: Chicago brother-sister group with a really sexy, spacey dub reggae kind of sound. They may be famous already-- hard to say what counts these days-- but they're really excellent.

Escort: killer disco band from New York. Think we're going to playing some gigs with them sometime soon.

Rubblebucket: horn-section lead indie rock band from New York with tons of character and humor. Fronted by a super bad-ass gal who plays baritone sax. Every member of the group is an insanely talented and tasteful player.

Hudson Branch: Another indie group from Chicago. Beautiful, expansive tunes, interesting orchestration, and a lead singer who sounds a lot like Paul Simon. Think these guys could be massive if they get a break.

Friday, August 9, 2013

10 Questions: Luke Winslow-King


The rag time jazz and post war blues of Luke Winslow-King carry the feel of his transplant home of New Orleans.
Currently on the road in support of his latest album The Coming Tide on the Bloodshot Label, he'll be playing two free show here in the Portland area.

Friday, August 16th
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St
Show: 7PM
Free
21 & Over

and

Sunday, August 18th
Elizabeth Caruthers Park
3508 SW Moody Ave
Show: 3PM
Free
All ages

With the new album and a busy touring schedule, we're very thankful he could take some time out of his busy life to talk to us at BLS.

BLS: Back in April you released your debut album The Coming Tide on the Bloodshot label. Though you have a long history in music, what was it like recording your first album?


LWK: I have self-released two other albums over the years, but it was very exciting to release The Coming Tide with Bloodshot last April. We put a lot into the songs and it was great to see them reach a wider audience. We recorded it at Piety Street Studios in New Orleans with a cast of great instrumentalists from the city.


BLS: The Coming Tide is ripe with a jazzy ragtime feel. As a transplant to New Orleans which came first the music or the city?


LWK: I had always been interested in jazz and blues music growing up, but I developed a specific interest in ragtime and traditional jazz after moving to New Orleans in 2002. The music appealed to me because it was improvisational yet danceable, complex yet still melodic enough to be ‘peoples music’. I’m glad to have had the opportunity to discover my own musical voice in New Orleans surrounded by these influences.


BLS: Your music is a sweet throw back to post war blues and dustbowl jazz. At what age were you introduced to this style of music? Is there a particular individual you have to thank for the introduction?


LWK: I started playing old time music in high school. I first was interested in Woody Guthrie, and then later discovered Charlie Patton and Jelly Roll Morton. There were a lot of great musicians that influenced me along the way; Seth Bernard, John Boutte, Roberto Luti, and Washboard Chaz, to name a few.


BLS: You have been studying music since a teenager. What are some of the benefits of having all that knowledge to draw on? Are there any drawbacks?


LWK: Yes, I’m glad to have started studying music from an early age. Having a understanding of music theory and composition has informed my writing and arranging along the way.
It makes it easier to create the sounds you are imagining in your head, and articulate them to others. Sometimes I do try to ignore certain elements of my training when writing though. It is refreshing for me a times to write clear and relatable melodies without involving too much sophistication.


BLS: In your schooling you spent time studying music in the Czech Republic’s Prauge. Did your time their influence your music in any way? Are there any other international influences you pull upon?

LWK: I do still find my self reminiscing about my time studying in the Czech Republic.
I spent time there analyzing scores from Dvorak, Martinu, Smetena, and Mozart. I was inspired to learn how these composers had transformed their regional music into classical forms, Taking simple folk themes and morphing them into symphonies.
This is not exactly what I am up to with my music today, but it’s definitely something to strive towards. I also enjoy Bela Bartok from Hungary.


BLS: On the album you are joined by the lovely vocals of Esther Rose who also plays wash board. Who else is on the record with you? Do they make up your touring band? How did you develop these collaborative relationships?

LWK: The Coming Tide features; Esther Rose on washboard and vocals, Cassidy Holden on bass, Ben Polcer on trumpet and piano, Rich Levinson on drums, and guest appearances by Rick Trolsen on trombone, Chris Johnson, Bruce Brackman, and Tom Saunders on saxes. On the road I’ve been performing as a trio with Cassidy and Esther a lot, but we add drums and a horn section at the bigger gigs. We have a really active music scene in New Orleans, and we are glad to have relationships with so many great players around town.


BLS: On the album your cover of George Harrison’s “I Got My Mind Set On You” is a truly unique treatment of the song. How did you arrive at this version? Do you have a specific approach you take when considering to cover a song?


LWK: I came up with my version of ‘ I’ve Got My Mind Set on You’ while strumming the guitar on the porch one day. I was inthralled by these repetitive droning pattens that I had learned listening to North Mississippi blues (Fred MacDowell, R.L. Burnside). I simplified the song by removing the bridge and major parts of the melody. I tried to approach the song like I imagined Jessie Mae Hemphill would have.


BLS: How does your style of music affect your instrument choices?

LWK: I gravitate towards older instruments that have a rich tone. It seems that some of the instruments I find along the way are just waiting to be played again.


BLS: Your music pulls on both jazz and blues. Though inarguably these styles are derivatives of the same root elements, they are still considered in many circles drastically separate genres. In your opinion, both musically and chronologically, when are/were these genres more similar than separate?


LWK: I think that jazz and blues were more closely related in the pre-war days.
Through the 1950‘s, as these genres became more urbanized, they started branching out into bebop, jump blues, and eventually rock and roll. It seems that in the teens and 20’s they were harder to decipher.


BLS: Name 5 bands you love but who few people have heard of?


LWK:
Karen Dalton,

Mance Lipscomb

Lil’ Bob & the Lollypops

Joseph Spence

Bukka White.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

The Triple Crown: 08/12 - 08/25



Tuesday, August 13th
The Heavy
The Silent Comedy
Mississippi Studio
3939 N Mississippi
Doors: 8PM / Show: 9PM
Adv.: $12 / Day Of: $12
21 & Over

Like the bastard sons of James Brown, The Heavy have a sounds that's equal parts Detroit back ally attitude and crossroad's devil-deal  blues. Blessed with a bad ass soul that feel strait out of a Shaft movie, these boys from the UK are powerful and bold. The way they administer their cold-cocked funk makes you want to shake your money maker in a ways that's illegal in fifteen countries. Best known for the use of their song "How You Like Me Now?" in numerous commercials and other arenas. We're lucky to have the chance to catch then in such an intimate venue as the Mississippi Studio.  Joining them is the folk rock of  San Diego-based The Silent Comedy. Even though it's a work night this should be an awesome show so make sure you get there early. 




Thursday, August 15th
JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound
Brownish Black
Lola's Room
1332 W Burnside
Doors: 7PM / Show:8PM
Adv.: $15 / Day Of: $17
All Ages

The soulful crooning of JC Brooks and the Uptown Sound is like the caress of a good lover. Telling in its urgency, it is both comforting and exciting and always leaves you wanting more. Based out of Chicago this neo-soul group has a sound that transitions the heydays of it's influencing genera. From 50's doo wop to the grooving funk of the 70's, their sound is bold and rich. Touring in support of their latest album Howl, their show at the Crystal Ballroom's little sister venue Lolo's Room should be awesome. Opening the night is the funky grove of Portland's Brownish Black. If you grew up listening to your folk's soul LP's this is the show you want to catch. So get yourself dapper and pull that lover close to you on the dance floor.

 
Monday, August 19th
Mother Falcon
Mississippi Studio
3939 N Mississippi
Doors: 7PM / Show: 8PM
Adv.: $8 / Day Of: $10
21 & Over

Paring symphonic instrumentation with the pop sensibility of an indi-rock band Mother Falcon is truly unique. Based out of Austin this group has truly developed a signature sound with boldly sweeping strings, punctuating horns and multiple other instruments creating a vibrant collage of sound. Consisting of a cast of 17 artist it will be interesting just to see how they fit them all up on the stage. If you are looking for something totally different this is a safe bet. Great music preformed in a wonderfully interesting way Mother Falcon is a awesome way to shake off the painful grind of your Monday. Don't make an early morning an excuse because with a 7PM start time there'll be enough time to get your beauty rest.     

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

About Last Night: Volume Bomb CD Release @ The Tonic

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
Last Night the Tonic was bursting with some of the greatest punk bands in Portland, all thanks to Keith Littlefield of Volume Bomb Records. Celebrating the release of Volume Bombs' Portland punk compilation Blown Fuses Bloody Ears, the night was jammed pack with great performances from six outstanding local acts.

Opening the night was the wonderful nerd core of Thundering Asteroids. Always a pleasure to watch the band got the night off right even though initially facing a few technical difficulties. Min and the boys were energetically fun and persevered through the adversities like punk rock champs. This was my wife's first opportunity to see the band and as I anticipated, she loved them.

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
Next up was the bombasticly dynamic Dartgun and the Vingnette. Being the first time to catch this band I was blown away. Their unique mix of  soul sister vocals and brit-fluence punk came off as one of the freshest things I've heard in years. Controlling the stage like a power crazed dictator Chuck Thrust boldly captured the audience and led us to the the brink of fanaticism. All the while tempered with the beautiful vocal melodies of the Vingnettes. I recall being drawn to their tracks on the compilation but now having witnessed the glory that is this band's live performance I am a true believer.

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
A hard act to follow, the Anxieties did good, continuing the energy with their excitable next wave punk. Like Tom Cruve on coke this band played with a powerfully anxious vibe; sounding like a hybrid mix of the Ramons and the Damned. Fun and lively the set was a pleasure to witness and like Dartgun and the Vingette's I look forward to seeing them play again soon.

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
Now, as for the The Thornes I can't tell you for certain  whether they're metal or punk, but hardcore is exactly what they are. With a two guitar attack and a rhythm section that feels like a prison beating this band drives their sound with the power of a fully loaded semi-truck. I was standing in front or the speaker and the amount of air coming off of them felt like a high power fan. Top that off with the wildly unpredictable stage antics of Justin Thorne and you have a live act I won't ever forget. Even it you're not a fan of their style of music I would tell you that catching this band live is a must.

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
Even as the night drew long the good music kept coming in the form of  42 Ford Prefect. Roughly aggressive the speed punk of this band has the power to send your body into spastic convolutions of punk joy. While the guttural vocals had a deeply primal nature to them. Most important though was the fact that this night won't have been possible if not for the work of 42 Ford Prefect's drummer Jesse and guitars Keith who's tireless efforts made Blown Fuses Bloody Ears a reality.

Photo By Mark A Lawrence IV
Topping off the night was the whiskey growl of Stumblebum. Raw and rough as gravel this band is all you'd ever want in a punk rock outlaw. Playing as abrasively as they sound this band was aggressively bold on stage working the crowd into a frenzy. A perfect closer, this band carried the night to a strong finish making this an awesome celebration of an amazing compilation.


    







Monday, August 5, 2013

Cure for the Mondays: Ms Mr - "Fantasy"

Ms Mr - "Fantasy"

It's true, cheerleaders are filled with glitter.



The beautifully spacious music of Ms Mr is so audibly unique, it's no wonder the band's popularity is growing by dramatic measures.From the release of their Candy Bar Creep Show EP in late 2012 this New York duo of Lizzy Plapinger and Max Hershenow has been building their exposure through extensive touring and growing radio play. Touring in support of the recent release of their debut album Secondhand Rapture the band will be playing a sold out show at our own Crystal Ballroom Monday, August 12th. So if you have tickets, count yourself lucky; but no matter what, give this band a listen, you won't be disappointed.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

From the Shelf: Blown Fuses Bloody Ears (2013)


Blown Fuses Bloody Ears
Volume Bomb Records

Like the greatest punk rock mix tape you were ever given, Blown Fuses Bloody Ears is the best punk compilation I've heard in years, if not ever. Showcasing the diverse pallet of Portland's independent punk scene this CD has songs from some of the greatest bands currently playing our local scene.

Laid out so that each song leads perfectly into the next; from Sumblebum's opening country tinged "Love Song In Reverse" to the closing gothic metal of The Thornes' "Wolfpack", this CD is masterfully built. The resulting album has an emotional presence that rises and falls in a naturally organic manner proving each song a space of its own to be appreciated long enough before wowing you with the next.

You're going to want to play this CD over and over, just save your self the hassle and by two copies now because your going to burn the first one out eventually. Yeah you're going to have your favorite tracks like the Thorntown Tallboys' "Whiskey(Black Eyes)" or The Anxieties' "Obsolete Man"but this comp is so good it's going to change almost every time you listen to it.

Now you you say your not a punk person, well I'd argue Blown Fuses Bloody Ears is so good if you have even the slightest hint of the primal human instinct in you that you'll be able to find something.  If your not willing to give it a try then the punk streak in me would say: "Why don't you sulk back to your snooty nuvo-jazz club and stop breathing my air."   

10 Questions: Keith Littlefield of Volume Bomb Records


As the guitarist for Portland punk outfit 42 Ford Prefect and the head of Volume Bomb Records Keith Littlefield is doing his part to make Portland's music scene  one of the best in the world. With the release of the Blown Fuses and Bloody Ears compilation, we took some time to find up what he was up to.

BLS: As the guitarist of the band 42 Prefect and the driving force behind Volume Bomb records you wear many hats. What would you say is the hardest thing about being an independent artist and running your own label?

KL: Playing in the band is easy. I'm lucky to play with three great guys who all want to do stuff and are excited about it. Getting the comp together was surprisingly smooth, considering there's 9 bands to organize. What is really hard, honestly frustrating rather than hard, is the PR and networking part. I want every band involved with this to do well, which means I've spent countless hours contacting music journalists and blogs, doing design work, and putting up fliers around town. As a musician I want to let music stand on its own, but there's a lot of background work to do.

BLS: You spent years in the music industry, most recently as an active part of the Portland scene since 2009. How did you get started? What is you favorite thing about our towns music scene? Your least? How does it compare to other scenes you’ve been a part of?

KL: I started playing live music in a band called Black Ops (Denver), but I grew up in a household full of musicians and have been surrounded by musicians my whole life. Portland's music scene is undeniably great. There's an overall level of talent here that is staggering if you're coming out of a small town. I've seen bands here playing for 5 people that would be rock n roll icons almost anywhere else. Which brings me to my least favorite part: we are so inundated by great acts that we take them for granted, and I wish bands and crowds were just a bit more excited about the sheer number of solid shows that are happening on a nightly basis. As far as other scenes go, there's parts I miss about Denver, but from what I gather it was the decade not the location. It was a good time for blistering rock n roll, but there's no way in Hell I'd trade the scene here to go back.

BLS: You’ve just released the compilation album: Blown Fuses Bloody Ears. How did this project develop and what’s the inspiration behind it?

KL: Our bass player (Chris) and I were drunkenly ranting one night about how much we missed good punk comps like the Punch Drunk and Give Em The Boot series. We realized how many bands turned into our favorites because we picked up a cheap comp based on one or two other bands. I believe that the final decision was a slurred "If they can do it, so can we!"

BLS: How did you decide which bands were included on the compilation and which songs were presented?
KL: All the bands on the comp are bands that I have gone to see purely because I enjoy their live set. I've played with all of them and play with a few of them on a regular basis. Basically, this is my favorite mix of bands that I've had the pleasure to play with over the last year. Picking the songs was a little bit trickier since genre wise the bands are so spread out. I asked for their fastest and hardest 3-4 songs and picked 2 that would fit well in a mix. The comp jumps around a bit, but I'm a fan of spastic mixes.

BLS: In the bigger picture, what would you like to do with the Volume Bomb label? What future projects do you have floating off in the ether?

KL: The goal right now is to get a comp out every year with some different and recurring bands. I've discussed, but not finalized, doing some split 7s between some of the bands, including my own. Even if this works well, I still can't see running Volume Bomb as a business. I'd rather it be a stamp on a record jacket that people recognize, and a way to further any project that fits and wants to be affiliated. We will see where it goes.

BLS: On another note, what developments are happening with your band 42 Prefect?

KL: After the comp comes out, we are spending a few months writing some new stuff and revamping some older material. Between the comp and the video we put out, I feel like I want to get back to just playing hardcore and not producing it. Expect a 7-inch of new material before we go on tour next summer though. With Patrick, our new guitarist, we've been able to add some elements that I feel were missing before he joined.

BLS: Besides these two projects, do you have any other musical irons in the fire?

KL: Only minimally. I do some home recording and production work for buddies making demos and that sort of thing. Chris and I have an older recording project called Night Ghast, based around HP Lovecraft, that we've been wanting to bring back.

BLS: I hear that you’re a big jukebox fan. In your opinion of all of the bars in Portland which three have the best jukeboxes?

KL: The Water Trough's (4815 SE Hawthorne Blvd)  jukebox goes from MC5 and the Murder City Devils to Willy Nelson and Iron Maiden. They also have been good about throwing in local stuff every once in a while. The comp may be in there by the time this comes out.

Hanigan's The Vern (2622 SE Belmont St) has a solid punk rock jukebox and every time I go in there I'm impressed.

Gil's Speakeasy (609 1/2 SE Taylor St) has had one of the better jukeboxes in town since I moved here in 2005. It's always changing, but it has always been good.

BLS: You are having a release party for Blown Fuses Bloody Ears Saturday August 3rd at the Tonic lounge. What should we expect from the show?
KL: The 6 bands that could do the show all have high energy live shows and I would make every single one of them the headliner if I could. I'd expect to see a lot of singers on the floor and a few people getting up on stage to scream along. There will be dancing if you can call it that; it should be fun spastic night. The sound system has been redone at the Tonic and I plan on taking full advantage of every watt they have.

BLS: Name 5 bands you love but who few people have heard of?

KL: 
The Pine Hill Haints (Alabama): Acoustic Americana and their shows are more punk than most hardcore shows I've seen.

The Motards (Austin, TX): Snotty as hell, treble-charged, drunk punk.

Criminal Damage (Portland, OR): The closest to Blitz style punk rock I've had the pleasure to see.

The Tee Vees (Vancouver, BC): Just solid garage rock.

Bright Channel (Denver, CO): Dear friends from my Denver days and proof that shoe gaze can be ballsy as all hell.